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OH&S POLICY

OH&S Policy Document

Occupational Health & Safety Management System 

VideoEditOz 13th August 2022

 

Authorised by: Bruce G. Macbryde

 

 

SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 

 

 

1.1 Overview 

This document reflects the attitude and intentions of VideoEditOz with respect to our Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) system, and it forms an integral part of our management practices. We follow a risk management process to identify, assess and eliminate or control risks to our employee’s health and welfare, as described in the policies and procedures following. Employees are informed and consulted in this risk management process in order to maintain safety in the workplace. 

Employees are trained and instructed to follow the systems relevant to their work as described in this manual. Policies, procedures and safe work practices are reviewed regularly, and staff are consulted on potential changes that affect the workplace. 

1.3 Responsibilities 1. Employer 

The Managing Director is ultimately responsible for providing a safe working environment for the company’s employees. This includes meeting the legal and regulatory requirements as set down by the State authorities, and providing sufficient resources and systems to ensure safety is sufficiently well managed. 

The Managing Director shall periodically review the status of safety and injury management in the workplace in consultation with employees, and implement changes that will improve safety. 

The Managing Director shall ensure that employees are sufficiently trained in, and informed of relevant OH&S systems pertaining to their job and workplace. 

2. Employees
The following are the OH&S responsibilities of VideoEditOz’s employees: 

 

  • Do not knowingly put yourself or other workers at risk of illness or injury by your actions or omissions.

  • Report hazards in the workplace where the hazard could put themselves, a fellow worker or the public at risk of injury or illness.

  • Participate in the risk assessment and risk control process.

  • Follow safe work practices as developed by the company in consultation with
    employees.

  • Wear and maintain appropriate PPE as provided, appropriate to their role.

  • Participate in OH&S training, awareness and competency assessment as required.

  • Report a disability/injury/illness to VideoEditOz management as soon as practical after becoming aware of the disability/injury/illness.

  • Where an injury or illness has occurred, to undertake appropriate treatment from the doctor of their choice, and participate in a safe return to work program.

  • Accept the provision of safe and suitable alternative duties where they form part of any agreed rehabilitation plan.

1.4 Definitions 

Competent person ‐ for any task means a person who has acquired through training, qualification or experience, or a combination of them, the knowledge and skills to carry out that task. 

Employee ‐ means an individual who works under a contract of employment or apprenticeship. Employer ‐ means a person who employs persons under contracts of employment or apprenticeship. 

Guard ‐ an appropriately licensed person employed by a company to carry out static or mobile guarding duties. Guards who carry out mobile guarding duties are also known as patrol officers. 

Guarding ‐ the provision of trained and appropriately licensed personnel to a defined location for a set period of time, for the protection of people and assets. 

Occupational health and safety legislation includes: 

  • the provisions of the Act and Regulations, and

  • the associated occupational health and safety legislation.
    Occupier of premises includes:
    • a person who, for the time being, has (or appears to have) the charge, management or
    control of the premises, or
    • a person who, for the time being, is in charge (or appears to be in charge) of any operation being conducted on the premises.
    Place of work ‐ means premises where persons work.
    Plant ‐ includes any machinery, equipment or appliance.
    Premises ‐ includes any place, and in particular includes:

  • any land, building or part of any building;

  • any vehicle, vessel or aircraft;

  • any installation on land, on the bed of any waters or floating on any waters; or

  • any tent or movable structure.
    Subcontractor – a person or company who has entered into an agreement to provide specified services to VideoEditOz.

 

 

SECTION 2 COMPANY POLICIES 

 

 

2.1 Occupational Health and Safety Policy 

The management of VideoEditOz are committed to providing a safe working culture amongst our employees. We recognise the importance of maintaining a safe and healthy work environment for our staff, our subcontractors and for those around us. 

To achieve this, our management team shall: 

  • comply with all relevant occupational health and safety laws and regulations, industry Acts, Regulations and Codes of Practice, and client requirements;

  • consult with employees and their representatives in matters relating to workplace safety;

  • communicate and inform employees and subcontractors in matters relating to workplace safety;

  • provide and maintain a safe working and community environment;

  • implement mechanisms that allow all staff to participate in the development of a safe
    working environment that is as risk‐free as possible;

  • identify hazards, assess risk, eliminate risk and initiate risk control measures;

  • develop and maintain safe working practices;

  • provide relevant training to ensure staff are competent to carry out their job;

  • provide adequate resources to ensure the health and safety of staff, subcontractors and those around us;

  • provide appropriate supervision to ensure work is carried out in a safe and healthy manner;

  • regularly review all health and safety systems to maintain their effectiveness.
    The management of VideoEditOz shall ensure that regulatory requirements pertaining to safety matters under the OH&S Act are complied with, communicated with staff and that appropriate training is provided as required.
    Ultimately we strive to ensure that our employees are provided with a work environment that is safe and healthy and protects our staff from potential injuries and illnesses.
    Signed: Bruce Macbryde Date: 6th March 2010 Principal

 

2.2 Communication and Consultation Policy 

The Principal maintains ultimate responsibility for the OH&S system at VideoEditOz. 

We recognise that employee consultation and participation in our safety system is vital and improves decision–making about health and safety matters in the workplace. Consultation is also included in the process of risk assessments and the development of our safe work practices. 

Employees of VideoEditOz shall be actively involved in the OH&S system. Suggestions for change and improvements to policies, procedures or safe work practices are encouraged, through reporting to management. Regular meetings to consult and inform employees on safety issues shall be conducted through staff meetings. 

Staff shall be made aware of safety issues relating to their jobs on a regular basis. The manner of doing so will vary depending upon the type of information to be conveyed. One of the following methods shall be used: 

  • Notice board – to alert staff to OH&S issues, changes to policies, procedures or safe work practices, recent incidents on site.

  • Mail out – safety information may be conveyed through a mail out to employees. This would most likely occur with the regular mailing out of pay slips.

  • Verbal contact – for more immediate safety concerns, staff shall be contacted verbally.
    Procedures for communication and consultation are maintained and reviewed as necessary with input from employees. An issues resolution procedure shall also be maintained and reviewed, which allows for an agreed process of resolving OH&S issues arising.
    Communication and consultation with staff is a significant aspect of our safe working culture. We expect our employees to be committed to working with management in order to effectively manage health and safety on the job. Staff are encouraged to contribute to decisions that may affect their health and safety in the workplace, through contact with management and staff meetings.
    Management shall work in conjunction with employees to review and update this, and other, policies and procedures

Signed: Bruce G. Macbryde Date: 13th August 2022 Principal 

 

2.3 Fatigue Policy 

As a part of VideoEditOz’s commitment to achieving a safe and healthy work environment for our employees, and those around us, we recognise the importance of fatigue in the workplace. Fatigue can have a significant impact in terms of how security tasks are carried out, and could potentially pose a risk for our employees, clients and the general public. As such, we are continually updating our programs to identify and control fatigue and boredom on the job. 

All employees are expected to be well rested prior to commencing work for the day. Management shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that workers are able to carry out their work without becoming fatigued. 

For all security related jobs where fatigue is considered to present a hazard, a workplace risk assessment shall be carried out. This process shall identify, assess and manage risks associated with fatigue. 

All employees will be made aware of the effects of fatigue on undertaking their role safely. Employees are also made aware of how to reduce fatigue and strategies that could be used to minimise fatigue. 

For all jobs that require rosters to be used, VideoEditOz’s rostering principles shall be documented and followed. These shall provide guidance on the generation of rosters to ensure that they do not impact on fatigue levels. 

Where security guards are required to work long periods standing, driving, or under stressful situations, strict guidelines for breaks and fatigue management shall be generated and discussed with those employees. 

Responsibility for implementation of this policy lies with the Principal. Management shall work in conjunction with employees to review and update this, and other, policies and procedures. 

Signed: Bruce G. Macbryde Date 13th August 2022 Principal 

 

2.4 Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy 

VideoEditOz is committed to achieving a healthy and safe working environment for our employees. As such, VideoEditOz recognises that alcohol, drug or other substance abuse by employees can have serious adverse effects on their own health and the safety of others. As such, all employees must not: 

  • consume alcohol nor be under the influence of alcohol while working;

  • use or possess illegal drugs at any workplace; nor

  • drive a vehicle, having consumed alcohol or suffering from the effects of illegal substances.
    If a co‐worker suspects another to be affected by drugs or alcohol, they must inform their Supervisor immediately. No employee will be allowed to work under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
    Employees undergoing prescribed medical treatment with a controlled substance that may affect the safe performance of their duties are required to report this to their Supervisor.
    All issues pertaining to these matters shall be kept strictly confidential.
    A breach of this policy may initiate appropriate action including the cancellation of employment or subcontractor agreement.
    Responsibility for implementation of this policy lies with the Principal. VideoEditOz is committed to ensuring that all employees are aware of the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse and the potential dangers they impose in the workplace. Management shall work in conjunction with employees to review and update this, and other, policies and procedures.

Signed: Bruce G. Macbryde Date:13th August 2022 Principal 

 

2.5 Bullying and Occupational Violence Policy 

Workplace bullying and violence are unacceptable and against the law. 

VideoEditOz is committed to ensuring that bullying and occupational violence does not occur amongst our employees. Whilst the environment that we work within might expose our employees to a potentially violent situation, we take all steps possible through our risk management approach to safety, to ensure that this is minimised. 

Bulling is considered to be repeated, unreasonable behaviour directed toward an employee, or group of employees, that creates a risk to health and safety. It includes: 

  • verbal abuse

  • excluding or isolating workers

  • psychological harassment

  • assigning meaningless tasks unrelated to the job

  • giving workers impossible assignments

  • deliberately changing work rosters to inconvenience particular workers

  • deliberately withholding information that is vital for effective work performance.
    Occupational violence is considered to be any incident where a person is physically attacked or threatened in the workplace, whether by a co‐worker, subcontractor or client. It includes:

  • striking, kicking, scratching, biting, spitting or any other type of direct physical contact

  • throwing objects

  • attacking with knives, guns, clubs or any other type of weapon

  • pushing, shoving, tripping grabbing

  • any form of indecent physical contact.
    Bullying and occupational violence as described above is not tolerated.
    Responsibility for implementation of this policy lies with the Principal, and all staff shall be made aware of this policy. Management shall work in conjunction with employees to review and update this, and other, policies and procedures.
    A breach of this policy may initiate appropriate action such as loss of employment. 


  • Signed: Bruce G. Macbryde Date: 13th August 2022 Principal

 

2.6 Smoking Policy 

VideoEditOz is committed to providing a safe and healthy work environment. Smoking is not permitted in the workplace or on client’s sites. The following rules must be adhered to: 

  • Smoking is prohibited in enclosed workplaces and company motor vehicles.

  • Smoking is prohibited in areas where chemicals are stored, and in and around other
    fire hazard areas.

  • Smoking is prohibited on construction sites or sites where building or renovation is being undertake.

  • Smoking is prohibited on all client premises.
    Where employees might be exposed to passive smoking through their security tasks, then this should be reported to the Principal so that management can discuss other possible arrangements with the client.
    Responsibility for implementation of this policy lies with the Principal. Management shall work in conjunction with employees to review and update this, and other, policies and procedures.

Signed: Bruce G. Macbryde Date: 13th August 2022 Principal 

 

2.7 Rehabilitation / Return to Work Policy 

VideoEditOz is proactive in its approach to injury management and places strong emphasis on the safe, timely and sustainable return to work program for injured or ill workers. 

We are committed to: 

  • prompt injury notification

  • communication and consultation with all parties to develop an appropriate return to work program

  • accountability and responsibility for injury management being clearly understood

  • provision of suitable meaningful activities during the return to work process, and

  • dispute resolution as required.
    VideoEditOz will ensure the following positive approach in meeting these objectives, including:

  • early reporting of injuries

  • appropriate and timely medical intervention and return to work planning

  • provision of suitable resources and productive duties for the injured worker

  • positive support and encouragement during the rehabilitation process

  • review of incidents and accidents to seek preventive measures and continuous
    improvement.
    Responsibility for implementation of this policy lies with the Principal, who may appoint a competent Return to Work Co‐ordinator (as required by regulation). Management shall work in conjunction with employees to review and update this, and other, policies and procedures. 


  • Signed: Bruce G Macbryde Date: 13th August 2022 Principal

 

2.8 Privacy Policy 

VideoEditOz collects personal information in compliance with the National Privacy Principles to the extent required by the Privacy Act 1988 (and amendments). Only information that is necessary for the business activities of the company shall be collected. 

VideoEditOz may collect personal information from future job applicants, customers, contractors, suppliers, credit providers, publicly available sources of information and from an individual’s authorised representative (e.g. spouse, professional adviser). A finite life expectancy for the holding and appropriate destruction of data shall be established. 

This personal information is generally used to provide an individual with services requested, to respond to queries and to make an individual aware of other company services. It is also used in complying with legal requirements and maintaining relationships with contractors and suppliers. 

VideoEditOz understands and respects the confidential nature of, and the importance of keeping personal information and only discloses such information to third parties in limited circumstances such as credit providers and credit reporting agencies, an individual’s authorised representative, the company’s professional advisers or Government and regulatory authorities as legally required. 

All personal information is retained in a secure environment and all reasonable precautions are taken to prevent unauthorised access to, or disclosure of, personal information. 

Persons requiring access to their personal information can do so via the Principal, who shall comply in accordance with National Privacy Principles. 

If the person is of the opinion that their personal information is not correct, complete or up‐to‐ date, this can be amended through the Principal. 

Signed: Bruce G. Macbryde Date: 13th August 2022 Principal 

SECTION 3 OH&S PROCEDURES 

 

 

3.1 Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment & Risk Control Procedure 

Purpose
The purpose of this procedure is to provide processes to be followed in the: 

  • identification of hazards;

  • the assessment and quantification of risks; and

  • implementation of controls.
    Scope
    This procedure applies to all worksites where VideoEditOz employees provide guarding and/or crowd control services.
    References
    Site Risk Assessment and Control Plan
    Risk Assessment Form
    Site Inspection Checklist
    Cash in Transit Code of Practice 2002
    Definitions
    Hazard ‐ any situation or condition with the potential to cause harm to the safety and health of people, damage to property or harm to the environment.
    Risk ‐ the chance of something happening that will have an impact upon objectives. It is measured in terms of consequence and likelihood.
    Identification of hazards ‐ involves recognising things which may cause injury or harm to the health or safety of a person.
    Risk assessment ‐ involves looking at the possibility of injury or harm occurring to a person if exposed to a hazard.
    Risk control ‐ involves introducing measures to eliminate or reduce the risk of a person being injured or harmed.
    Actions
    Risk assessments for all potentially hazardous guarding activities shall be developed and recorded on the Risk Assessment form.
    In addition, each individual work site shall undergo a site risk assessment prior to the commencement of a new job. The results of this shall be recorded on the Site Risk Assessment and Control Plan form

The risk assessment process is used to: 

  • identify hazards;

  • assess the level of risk; and

  • remove the risk, or determine appropriate controls to be put in place.
    Risk assessments will be carried out by competent personnel who have undergone training relevant to this process, and are involved in the relevant work process. Training shall be provided to those undertaking risk assessments, which shall include techniques for hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control planning. Records of training shall be kept.
    The following guidelines on hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control shall form the basis for this process.

1. Hazard Identification
Hazard identification should be undertaken: 

  • Prior to commencement of work on a new site

  • Prior to a new safe work practice being initiated

  • When an incident/accident occurs

  • When new equipment/plant/tools are introduced

  • When new services/tasks are introduced

  • As a periodic check to verify safe systems of work
    A Site Inspection Checklist may be used to aid in the identification of potential hazards. In identifying hazards, the following activities may be undertaken:

  • consultation with staff, subcontractors and clients

  • reviewing incident/injury records

  • observing systems of work

  • determining levels of competence/experience of staff

  • fitness for purpose of equipment and vehicles used
    Hazards take many forms. Typical hazards associated with guarding and crowd control include:

  • Slips, trips and falls

  • Risk of violence

  • Electrical hazards

  • Noise

  • Being struck by traffic

  • Contact with bodily fluids

  • Fatigue or boredom

  • Airborne contaminants (eg passive smoking)

  • Exposure to the elements (eg rain/sun/wind)

  • Working in isolation

  • Crowd surge

 

• Manual handling
The hazard identification process shall take into account all facets of working on a particular site, 

such as: 

  • tasks performed

  • type of location/building, including activities that are undertaken on the premises as part of the working environment (eg factory, nightclub)

  • different roles of the guard (eg driving, walking, monitoring)

  • communications systems in use

  • vehicles used

  • use of personal protective equipment (PPE)

  • work methods, working conditions (ie likelihood of fatigue, stress), shiftwork arrangements

  • environmental factors (eg exposure to heat/cold, level of lighting, rain, traffic, number of people on site, exposure to bodily fluids and sharps)

  • manual handling issues

  • previous security incidents that have occurred on the site being reviewed

2. Risk Assessment 

Once hazards have been identified and recorded, the risks associated with each hazard need to be identified and classified according to the Risk Calculation Process (which is based on that used in the Cash in Transit Code of Practice 2002). This is done in order to determine the likelihood of someone being harmed by the hazard, and how to determine the likely severity of the injury/illness. The level of experience and the capabilities of all staff shall be taken into consideration throughout this process. All employees to whom the hazard might apply shall be consulted as a part of this risk assessment process. 

For each hazard identified, the following questions may be asked when determining the risk rating: 

  • How easily could someone be hurt?

  • Who is exposed to the hazard?

  • How often are they near the hazard, and how close do they get?

  • What would happen if they came into contact with the hazard?

  • Have there been any near misses involving the hazard?

  • Have there been problems with the hazard before, in your workplace or somewhere else?

  • Are there any current work practices that increase the likelihood of the hazard causing harm?
    The risk rating shall be recorded on the Site Risk Assessment and Control Plan form and/or the Risk Assessment Form.
    The level of risk shall then determine the priority for implementing appropriate controls.

3. Risk Control 

All identified hazards shall be addressed in terms of controlling for the possibility of injury or illness. Those risks that have been assessed as being critical shall be addressed first. All employees to whom the hazard might apply shall be consulted as a part of this risk control process. 

The measures taken to control the risks shall be appropriate to the associated hazard and level of risk that they pose. A hierarchy of controls shall be followed in determining an appropriate control mechanism. 

Foremost, the risk should be eliminated. Where it is not reasonably practicable to eliminate the risk, it must be controlled via the hierarchy of controls, as follows: 

  • 1)  Substitution (ie find alternatives)

  • 2)  Isolation (ie limit exposure to the problem)

  • 3)  Engineering controls (includes re‐design)

  • 4)  Administrative Controls (eg safe work practices, appropriate training, provision of enough personnel on site)

  • 5)  Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ‐ employees shall be trained to know when to use PPE and restraining devices, and how to use them correctly.

Control measures might include: 

  • No longer undertaking the activity

  • The development of safe work practices (see section 0)

  • Allocation of appropriate staff/resources to carry out a task

  • Communications systems

  • Provision of PPE

  • Training

  • Supervision

4. Monitoring and Review 

Controls implemented shall be monitored/reviewed to ensure risk mitigation is maintained in the most effective manner. This is the responsibility of the Principal who shall ensure appropriate workplace consultation takes place. 

 

Risk Calculation Process
Step 1 – Estimate the consequences of an incident occurring 

Consequence 

Incident 

Catastrophic Major Moderate Minor Insignificant 

Fatality or permanent serious disability or permanent ill health Serious injury, permanent part disability, long‐term illness Medical treatment required and several days off work
First aid treatment required 

 

No injuries
Step 2 – Estimate the likelihood of an incident occurring 

 

 

Likelihood 

 

 

Description 

 

Almost certain Likely 

Possible Unlikely Rare 

Expected to occur in most circumstances 

Will probably occur in most circumstances (ie has been known to occur, or has occurred before) 

Might occur at some time (ie have heard of it happening) Could occur, but no know instances previously


May occur only in exceptional circumstances 

 

Step 3 – Determine the risk rating 

Almost certain 

Catastrophic 

Major 

Moderate 

Minor 

Insignificant 

 

Likely 

 

Possible 

 

Unlikely 

Rare 

 

3.2 Safe Work Practices 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance on developing safe work practices in order to promote efficient and safe work methods. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to the development of all safe work practices associated with tasks undertaken by employees of VideoEditOz. 

References 

Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Control Procedure 3.1 

Safe Work Practice form 

Definitions 

Safe work practice – a process to be followed when undertaking particular tasks. It identifies work processes, PPE requirements, safety hazards and controls. 

Hazard ‐ any situation or condition with the potential to cause harm to the safety and health of people, damage to property or harm to the environment. 

Risk ‐ the chance of something happening that will have an impact upon objectives. It is measured in terms of consequence and likelihood. 

Identification of hazards ‐ involves recognising things which may cause injury or harm to the health or safety of a person, such as flammable materials, ignition sources or unguarded machinery. 

Risk assessment ‐ involves looking at the possibility of injury or harm occurring to a person if exposed to a hazard. 

Risk control ‐ involves introducing measures to eliminate or reduce the risk of a person being injured or harmed. 

Actions 

Safe work practices (SWP’s) may need to be developed to ensure that activities undertaken by security personnel are performed in a safe, efficient and consistent manner. These may be developed where: 

  • Practices need to be determined and employees trained.

  • Documented systems need to be in place for the benefit of subcontractors.

  • It is identified as a risk control strategy, following a risk assessment.

  • Specified by a client to ensure systems are in place and communicated.

  • Considered necessary by VideoEditOz management.
    Each work site shall undergo a risk assessment prior to the commencement of a new job (and at other times, when the workplace changes or injuries occur), as described in the Hazard
     

Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Control Procedure 3.1. In specific circumstances, it may be identified that a SWP is required as a risk control strategy. 

Management of, and compliance to, safe work practices shall be the responsibility of the Principal, and shall be developed in consultation with those employees involved in the particular task. 

Safe work practices shall be documented on the Safe Work Practice form and approved by the Principal, as part of the final consultative process. 

SWP’s shall identify the following (as a minimum): 

  • Instruction on how to undertake the work for a particular task

  • PPE requirements

  • Safety considerations (ie hazards and controls)

  • Communications between persons and areas

  • Training / experience requirements
    Once the SWP is approved it shall be made available to all staff undertaking that particular task and appropriate training and competency assessment shall be provided where necessary. Records of training shall be maintained.
    SWP’s shall be reviewed by relevant personnel (in consultation with others and the Principal) on a regular basis to ensure the appropriateness of the SWP. It shall also be reviewed and updated:

  • If the method of performing the task has changed.

  • Where additional hazards have been identified.

  • If an incident occurs related to the task.

3.3 Company Induction & Training 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to describe the process for induction and training of VideoEditOz employees with respect to our OH&S system. 

Scope
This procedure applies to all employees of VideoEditOz. References
Site Induction Procedure 3.24
Definitions
None
Actions
1. Induction 

A company induction shall be provided to all employees of VideoEditOz. Induction shall be provided once a new employee is appointed, plus refresher inductions at periodic intervals. This induction is in addition to Site Inductions where specific OH&S issues are discussed for the work location that a guard is situated. See Site Induction procedure 3.24. 

Induction shall cover all details relating to our OH&S system including policies, procedures, safe work practices and forms used in relation to the job. Records of employees having undertaken the OH&S induction shall be kept. 

2. Work Allocation 

VideoEditOz requires all security guards to be appropriately trained, competent and licensed (according to the Security Act) to undertake their allocated work. 

Work shall be allocated to employees based upon the: 

  • skills and training of employees;

  • specific requirements of the work to be undertaken; and

  • specific employee requirements (e.g. medical conditions, licences, permits)

3. Training 

Where necessary, employees shall be provided with training on safety related aspects of their job. The Principal shall be responsible for ensuring that this is undertaken as appropriate, and reviewed as necessary. 

Training can be provided on the job or in a more formal setting. Where necessary (and as required by security industry rules and regulations) appropriate supervision shall be provided to employees to ensure that they are capable of undertaking their tasks. Training records shall be maintained for each employee, identifying their relevant skills and training undertaken, and licenses held. 

 

3.4 Site Induction 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to describe the process of inducting employees onto work sites. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to the induction of employees onto work sites. 

References 

Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Control Procedure 3.1 

Company Induction and Training Procedure 3.3 

Site Risk Assessment and Control Plan form 

Site Inspection Checklist 

Site Self Induction form 

Definitions 

Hazard ‐ any situation or condition with the potential to cause harm to the safety and health of people, damage to property or harm to the environment. 

Actions
1. Site Induction 

A site induction shall be carried out for all employees new to a particular work site. No employee shall be allowed to work on a site where a site induction has not been carried out. 

Induction shall cover: 

  • Reporting responsibilities

  • Safe work practices relevant to the job

  • Site emergency systems (including emergency contacts, location of exits, site emergency procedures, fire fighting equipment, alarms)

  • Amenities (such as toilet/washroom facilities, rest/meal areas, first aid facilities, parking areas)

  • Site hazards (such as noise, machinery, lighting etc)

  • PPE requirements

  • Site communication systems (eg radio’s, phones)
    The Site Risk Assessment and Control Plan form shall be used for inducting employees, who will then sign and date that form.

As a part of the induction process, employees shall also be made aware of the results of the Site Inspection Checklist for that site. 

The Principal and/or the Supervisor shall be responsible for ensuring staff are inducted appropriately to work sites. Records off all inductions shall be maintained. 

2. Client Induction Process 

In many instances, the client will have a site induction procedure/system that they require our security guards to undergo. Security personnel shall undertake this induction process as required by the client. However they must also undertake our company site induction as described above. 

3. Emergency Work 

In the situation where we are required to provide emergency security services, and there has been no formal induction process previously provided for that site, security officers must do a self induction onto that site. This can be undertaken by using the Site Self Induction Form. 

4. Induction to a Construction Site 

Should a site where guarding services are required, be under construction, then the security guard shall be required to undertake site induction as specified by the construction industry and Regulation 2001. This may include the need to hold a WorkCover OHS Construction Induction Training Certificate. However guards must also undertake our company site induction as described above. Records of appropriate certified induction training shall be kept. 

A system of communication between the client and the security officer(s) must be established at this point, and noted on the Site Induction Form. The Principal and/or Supervisor shall ensure that the client is made aware that the security officer must be informed of changes to the site that may create additional hazards (for example, excavating, trenching, movement of plant, traffic management etc). 

5. Refresher Induction 

As needed, employees will undertake refresher induction to ensure the safety of our personnel. Refresher training may be needed in the following circumstances: 

  • Change in the scope of work

  • Safety incident occurring on site

  • Changes to the site/premises

  • Identification of new hazards
    See also Company Induction and Training procedure 3.3.

 

3.5 Workplace Consultation and Communication 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to describe the process for consultation with employees of VideoEditOz with respect to this OH&S system. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all employees of VideoEditOz. 

References 

Issue Resolution Procedure 3.26 

Code of Practice for OHS Consultation 2001 

Definitions 

Consultation ‐ meaningful discussion, advice and receiving and giving of opinion and ideas. 

Communication ‐ dissemination of information, conversing between parties and the sharing of information. 

Actions
Employees of VideoEditOz shall be consulted on OH&S issues, policies and procedures. 

Given the nature of the industry, with workplaces being numerous and often changing VideoEditOz has established a variety of means of communication that shall be used as appropriate. Where there is no OH&S committee, and the Principal takes ultimate responsibility for the OH&S system, ensuring employee consultation and communication occurs in accordance with the Code of Practice for OHS Consultation. 

Employees should discuss/report all safety issues directly with their Supervisor or Principal. 1. Regular Meetings to Discuss Safety Issues with Employees 

Management shall meet with employees on a regular basis (at least every 3 months) to discuss OH&S issues. For example, changes to policies or procedures, development of safe work practices, and discussion of specific OH&S issues related to daily security tasks. 

Minutes of these meetings shall be taken and kept on file. All those in attendance shall be noted on the minutes. Where actions are required, these shall be noted. 

2. Communicating Latest Safety Issues to Staff 

Staff shall be made aware of safety issues relating to their jobs on a regular basis. The manner of doing so will vary depending upon the type of information to be conveyed. One of the following methods shall be used: 

  • Notice board – to alert staff to OH&S issues, changes to policies, procedures or safe work practices, recent incidents on site.

  • Mail out – safety information may be conveyed through a mail out to employees. This would most likely occur with the regular mailing out of pay slips.

  • Verbal contact – for more immediate safety concerns, staff shall be contacted verbally.

  • De‐briefing session – to specifically detail the outcomes of particular incidents.

3. Communication with Clients 

The Principal and/or Supervisor shall maintain regular contact with the client, which shall involve discussions relating to security on the site and any OH&S issues that might arise. 

4. Review 

This process shall be reviewed periodically to ensure its effectiveness. Employees will be asked for feedback on the effectiveness of the process and on options for improvements. 

An issue resolution procedure shall also be maintained (see Issue Resolution procedure 3.26). 

 

3.6 Shiftwork and Fatigue 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to address the hazards associated with shiftwork and fatigue. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all employees of VideoEditOz undertaking security tasks. 

References 

Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Control Procedure 3.1 

Driving, Vehicle Safety and Driver Fatigue Procedure 3.7 

Definitions 

Shiftwork – work undertaken in segments/shifts or during extended hours. Typically for guards, this might involve working segments of a day when they might normally be sleeping. 

Fatigue – is a general sensation of weariness accompanied by feelings of lethargy and a disinclination for any kind of activity. Muscular fatigue arises from overstressed muscles. 

Roster ‐ a planned outline of who would undertake particular tasks at particular times. 

Actions 

1. Fatigue ‐ General 

Fatigue affects an individual’s capacity to perform work. The symptoms of fatigue include: 

  • feelings of weariness, somnolence, faintness and a distaste for work

  • sluggish thinking, lack of concentration and temporary memory loss

  • reduced alertness

  • poor and slow perception

  • unwillingness to work

  • a decline in physical and mental performance
    Individuals are particularly susceptible to fatigue when undertaking shiftwork, however there are many causes of fatigue.
    As far as practicable, VideoEditOz shall provide a work environment that minimises the potential for fatigue to develop. Work locations and tasks shall be assessed through the Risk Assessment process (see Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Control Procedure 3.1) to identify, assess and control for fatigue. As a part of this process, potential sources of fatigue shall be considered. This may include:

  • The workplace environment ‐ Noise exposure, vibration, temperature, working in isolation, poor ventilation.

  • The rostering system / shiftwork requirements for the job.

  • The tasks undertaken by the employee. Repetitive or monotonous tasks, sustained levels of concentration, shiftwork and duration of work.

  • The Person. The amount of sleep attained by that person, other non‐work commitments, any illnesses or injury or other jobs will potentially affect the level of fatigue experienced by that person.
    It is the employees’ responsibility to report for work in a fit state, which includes being well rested.

2. Shiftwork and Rostering Principles 

When determining shiftwork requirements / rosters for jobs, the following aspects shall be taken into consideration, subject to Clause 11: 

  • Minimise the number of times a guard is required to work a 10 hour shift

  • Guards who work extended hours should be allowed to have a longer break before
    their next shift

  • Minimise the number of consecutive night shifts a guard must work, or otherwise arrange for permanent night shifts

  • A maximum of 5x8 hour shifts or 4x12 hours shifts in a week

  • A minimum of 8 hours break before resuming an 8 hour shift

  • A minimum of 12 hours break before a shift longer than 8 hours

  • A 24 hour break provided before rotating to a new shift

  • In a 3 shift system, a forward rotating roster to be used (ie progression from morning to afternoon to night shifts)

  • Have personnel on‐call to cover for unexpected absences
    Rosters shall be reviewed regularly and any changes discussed with the employees.
    Employees shall be provided with an opportunity to give feedback on the roster’s effect on fatigue.

3. Fatigue on the job 

All employees shall be made aware of the impact of fatigue on their job. This will form part of the OH&S induction process. 

In terms of minimising the level of fatigue experience through carrying out security tasks, the following shall be taken into consideration: 

  • An appropriate number of employees shall be assigned to each job

  • Regular rest breaks to be provided

  • During a night shift, at least one rest break shall be provided (not including ordinary meal breaks)
    Also refer to Driving, Vehicle Safety and Driver Fatigue (OH&S Procedure 3.7) for guidance relating to fatigue and driving.
    6th March 2010 Page 31 of 50

1 Clause 1 of the OHS Regulation states 

3.7 Driving, Vehicle Safety and Driver Fatigue 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to establish safety guidelines for employees using vehicles provided by VideoEditOz. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all employees using vehicles provided by the company in order to carry out their security tasks. 

References 

Shiftwork and Fatigue Procedure 3.6 

Definitions 

Fatigue – is a general sensation of weariness accompanied by feelings of lethargy and a disinclination for any kind of activity. Muscular fatigue arises from overstressed muscles. 

Actions 

1. Vehicle Maintenance 

There are many work situations that require our security guards to be supplied with a vehicle in order to carry out their duties. VideoEditOz shall ensure that all vehicles supplied for employee use are regularly maintained. 

Employees must not drive a vehicle that they suspect is not operating properly. Any faults must be reported immediately to the Supervisor of VideoEditOz. The vehicle shall then be removed from service until the faults can be fixed. 

Vehicles shall be supplied with: 

  • Cargo barriers (in stations wagons or vans)

  • A dry chemical fire extinguisher specifically designed for vehicle fires

  • First aid kit

2. Driver and Passenger Safety Guidelines 

The following safety guidelines are communicated to all employees driving a vehicle for work purposes: 

  • Guards who operate a company vehicle must hold an up‐to‐date, valid driver’s license to operate the type of vehicle they have been assigned. A copy of this license shall be placed on the employee file.

  • Drivers are not to operate motor vehicles under the influence of alcohol, recreational drugs or medication likely to affect their driving performance.

  • Drivers shall operate company vehicles in accordance with relevant traffic legislation at all times.

  • Safety belts shall be used by all occupants travelling in a company vehicle, or in a private vehicle while on company business. Drivers must only transport the number of persons for which seatbelts are available.

  • Mobile phones must not be used while driving (to either make or take calls or send text messages), with the exception of using an approved ‘hands free’ mobile set.

  • For long distance trips, regular breaks must be taken.

  • Drivers must take appropriate cautions when driving conditions are hazardous (eg fog,
    heavy rain or icy conditions). This includes allowing enough time for travel.

3. Minimising Fatigue in Long Distance Driving 

To minimise fatigue, we take the following points into consideration as far as practical: 

  • schedule work so that the employee has a full night’s sleep prior to a long distance drive

  • schedule work to avoid last‐minute departures to a job that requires a long distance drive

  • discuss with the employee directions to the destination to ensure ease of travel

  • where practicable, arrange for the drive to a work‐site to be shared by two employees
    (ideally driving shifts will be no longer than two hours)

  • ensure drivers take rest breaks after two hours of driving even if there is only a short time before arriving at their destination

  • schedule the work so staff completing a shift can have a minimum of 8 hours break before they return

  • schedule the drive back to allow for rest breaks during the trip
     

 

3.8 Personal Protective Equipment 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to discuss the requirement for, and use of, personal protective equipment. 

Scope
This procedure applies to all employees and subcontractors.
References
Summary of the OHS Regulation 2001
Summary of the OHS Act
Definitions
Personal protective equipment – refers to specific equipment worn to reduce exposure to hazards. Actions 

Security personnel may be subject to a number of hazards that will require them to use personal protective equipment (PPE). For example, employees may be subjected to heat, solar radiation, dust, noise and, in many operations, specific dangers to hands, feet and the head exist. 

In these situations, VideoEditOz shall supply employees with suitable PPE in accordance with Clause 15 of the OHS Regulation2. The provision of PPE should always be considered as a last resort, when engineering or work procedures cannot remove a hazard. 

1. Suitability of Equipment 

PPE supplied to employees shall only be of an approved type. All equipment shall have the registered mark of the Australian Standards (AS) displayed, or be otherwise approved by the recognised National Code of Practice for that equipment. 

When PPE is required, every effort should be made to ensure that it is as comfortable to use as possible. Employees shall be responsible for maintaining PPE in a clean and operative condition. 

No employee shall receive dispensation from wearing the required PPE without a sound medical reason, supported by periodic doctor’s medical certificates. Where possible and practicable, the person receiving medical exception should be removed from that particular role. 

2 Clause 15 of the OHS Regulation states that the PPE provided must be appropriate, provided clean and hygienic, maintained, and stored appropriately. It also discusses the need to identify where PPE is required, and to inform users of how to use the PPE properly and any limitations it may have. 

 

2. Use of PPE 

Where necessary, employees shall be provided with instruction on the appropriate use and care for the PPE supplied. The following may be provided according to need (as identified through the risk assessment process): 

  • Helmets (AS 1801) ‐ Helmets should be properly adjusted for correct fit. No hats or caps shall be worn under helmets. Helmets that have suffered any significant impact shall be replaced. Helmets have a limited useful life even if not damaged by any impact. ‘Use‐by’ dates shall be noted and helmets replaced before expiry dates.

  • Safety Boots/Shoes (AS 2210) ‐ Safety footwear must be maintained in a good state of repair, and shall be replaced if damaged.

  • Eye Protection (AS 1337) ‐ Eye protection shall be used in workshop areas except when inside an enclosed vehicle, cab or in an area considered exempt. Persons exposed to the possibility of high speed particles require the highest degree of protection, and safety glasses shall be equipped with side as well as frontal protection. Safety glasses shall be comfortable and clean. Damaged safety glasses shall be replaced.

  • Hearing Protection (AS 1270) ‐ Guards shall have access to ear plugs or muffs or both as appropriate. Extra care must be taken in fitting ear muffs if eye protection is being worn. Any disturbance of the sealing surface of ear muffs or any tearing of the lining indicates the need for replacement.

  • Gloves (AS 2161, AS 2225) ‐ Gloves shall be worn when cuts, burns or hazardous substances present a hand hazard. Glove type must be suitable for the particular operation and hazard.

  • Wet Weather Clothing ‐ Wet weather gear, in the form of waterproof trousers and jackets, shall be available for use as required or in emergency situations.

  • Reflective/High Visibility Safety Garments (AS 4602) – Shall be worn when identified as part of a risk control or client requirement.

3. Clothing and Skin Protection 

Employees are expected to take reasonable precautions against exposure to the elements. Long trousers and long‐sleeved shirts are recommended. Caps or sun hats are also recommended. 

Sun block (factor 30+) shall be supplied for all employees undertaking outdoor work. 

 

3.9 Violence and Aggression 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to assist guards in identify situations where workplace violence may occur, and to train them in recognising the early signs of aggression and the necessary actions to be taken. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to any situation where guards may be exposed to workplace violence or aggression. 

References 

Removing or Detaining Aggressive, Abusive or Violent Person (Safe Work Practice) 

Definitions 

Violence ‐ includes verbal and emotional threats, and physical attack to an individual’s person or property by another individual or group. 

Actions 

It is important for guards to be aware of the early signs of aggression and what action, if any, is to be taken if someone becomes aggravated. 

1. Training
All guards shall be trained in the skills necessary to defuse potentially violent situations, including: 

  • Identifying verbal threats and intimidation

  • recognising the potential for violence in a situation

  • verbal and non‐verbal clues to violence

  • using pacifying words and body language to defuse violent situations

  • restraining and detaining techniques
    Guards shall not be expected to use restraining or detaining techniques until they are appropriately trained. VideoEditOz shall conduct regular evaluations of the competency and techniques of trained guards.
    New employees shall be supervised until management are satisfied that they are competent to handle these types of situations.

2. Restraining or Detaining 

In most circumstances guards need only to observe and report on potentially aggressive or violent behaviour. In special circumstances however, it may be necessary for guards to restrain or detain personnel. 

These circumstances include: 

  • where the person’s own safety is at risk

  • when a violent person’s actions are placing others at risk

  • where police are not available to deal with the situation
    Guards shall not give chase for the purpose of restraining or detaining an intruder, offender or patron.
    Guards shall inform their Supervisor of any incidents occurring of an aggressive or violent nature.

3. Emergency Procedure 

In the event of perceived danger, guards must call for back‐up or contact police, and withdraw to a position of safety. 

The Principal and/or Supervisor must be notified as soon as practical. 

VideoEditOz shall provide counselling services to all guards upon request and following dangerous incidents. 

Refer to the Safe Work Practice ‐ Removing or Detaining Aggressive, Abusive or Violent Person. 

 

3.10 Electrical Safety 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to provide information on the standards required to maintain an environment free of electrical safety hazards. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all VideoEditOz equipment and premises, and also client electrical equipment and premises that VideoEditOz employees may be subject to in their working environment. 

References 

AS/NZS 3760:2003 

Definitions 

None. 

Actions 

VideoEditOz shall ensure the following company standards are maintained: 

  • All electrical equipment and leads must be in good condition and inspected, tested and tagged as specified in AS/NZS 3760:2003.

  • Leads that pass through doorways or across traffic areas shall be protected.

  • Double adaptors and piggy back leads shall not be used – use approved sub boards
    only.

  • All electrical outlets where portable electrical equipment may be connected shall be protected by Residual Current Devices (RCD’s) or Earth Leakage Circuit Breakers (ELCB’s) either on the switchboard, at the socket supply or by using a portable device.
    Employees of VideoEditOz shall not tamper with, or in any way interfere with, electrical wiring, installations, apparatus or equipment belonging to the company or a client.
    When undertaking a risk assessment of a new or changed client workplace, the VideoEditOz employee shall check to ensure electrical safety by determining the following:

  • Electrical outlets are protected by RCD’s or ELCB’s at the switchboard or socket supply. If not, the VideoEditOz employee shall be provided with a portable device to connect directly to the socket if a risk of electrical hazard is deemed to exist.

  • Check that power outlets are not broken, cracked or show exposed wires. If faulty, do not use – report as a hazard.

  • Check that any extension cords or other electrical equipment to be used by VideoEditOz staff show current electrical test and tags. If not currently tagged, report as a workplace hazard and do not use the equipment/cords.

  • Ensure power cords and other electrical devices are not standing in, or affected by, water or other fluids such as leaking chemical containers etc. Report any such hazards.

3.11 Fire, Evacuation and Emergency Preparedness 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to plan for processes to be followed in the event of an emergency evacuation or fire emergency. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all worksites that VideoEditOz employees provide guarding and/or crowd control services to, where the site does not have its own specific emergency plan. 

References
Site Induction Procedure 3.4
Accident and Incident Reporting and Investigation Procedure 3.24
Definitions
Emergency Preparedness Plan – a plan that is in place and can be actioned in an emergency. Actions 

As a part of the site induction process, all employees shall be informed of specific fire, evacuation and emergency procedures at the workplace they are assigned. In many instances, this information (along with training) will be provided by the client. If the client does not have procedures in place, then these will be developed by VideoEditOz, in consultation with the client and security officer(s) involved. 

1. Fire 

The risk of fire breaking out in a particular workplace and spreading will depend upon the materials being used and stored, the standard of housekeeping, work practices, the construction and layout of the premises and the training of employees. 

The risk to people after a fire has started depends upon the adequacy and maintenance of a means of escape, the fire alarm system and the training of the personnel in fire and evacuation procedures. 

2. Evacuation 

Guards should follow any instructions given to them by the client and/or emergency services representatives in the event of an evacuation. 

Security guards must evacuate a worksite when: 

  • a fire alarm or an evacuation alarm is activated

  • it is hazardous to life to remain

  • instructed to evacuate by a member of an emergency service (such as fire brigade, police, state emergency services) which could be as the result of an emergency in the near vicinity and not your actual building
    6th March 2010 Page 39 of 50

• instructed to evacuate by a member of the emergency response team (e.g. Building Emergency Fire Warden) as indicated on the evacuation plan 

The following instructions must be followed when evacuating a site: 

  • walk quickly and directly ‐ DO NOT RUN

  • DO NOT stop to collect personal possessions

  • turn off power and gas if possible to do so

  • close doors (but do not lock), shut down plant and equipment before evacuating to limit the spread of fire, smoke and water damage

  • if you see other people not evacuating, call out to them to evacuate but do not stop moving toward the exit yourself

  • obey all instructions from emergency response personnel

  • DO NOT use lifts (as applicable) in the event of a fire or if there is risk of fire

3. Emergency Preparedness 

All work sites shall have an Emergency Preparedness Plan prominently displayed throughout the work site. Where this is not the case, VideoEditOz shall discuss the need for this with the client and where necessary work with them to develop such a plan. 

Emergency Preparedness Plans should take into account all aspects of a likely emergency and provide planned responses. The plan shall include the following: 

  • Workplace location and layout

  • Emergency telephone numbers

  • Identification of the personnel appointed to assume responsibility in an emergency

  • Hazardous materials and substances at the workplace if they are likely to endanger emergency services personnel

  • Internal structures that may endanger emergency service personnel in the duty of their work e.g. imminent collapse of a tunnel or plant during a fire or earthquake, asbestos in the building etc.

  • List of potential foreseeable emergencies such as vehicles parked in the way of emergency services

  • Specific planned response arrangements to potential emergencies

  • Arrangements for raising the alarm, reporting emergencies and alerting management
    and external authorities (Emergency Services, EPA, WorkCover etc)

  • Arrangements for evacuating the premises including the evacuation of the public (customers or subcontractors) who may be on the premises
    Where incidents/accidents have occurred, the procedure on Accident and Incident Reporting and Investigation (3.24) shall be followed.

3.12 First Aid 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to describe the first aid systems in place for all VideoEditOz employees. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all worksites where VideoEditOz has employees.

References None Definitions None Actions 

VideoEditOz shall ensure that all employees are provided with appropriate access to First Aid facilities, services and supplies at all work sites. It is important to ensure that employees can gain quick access to first aid kits and facilities in the event of an injury/illness. 

  •  

3.13 Working Safely in Heat 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to outline the process to be followed when working in temperatures in which heat stress may be a possibility. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all employees of VideoEditOz. 

References 

Personal Protective Equipment Procedure 3.8 

Site Risk Assessment and Control Plan form 

Code of Practice – Working in Hot or Cold Environments 

Definitions 

Heat stress ‐ refers to the total heat burden to which the body is subjected to by both external and internal factors (eg temperature, humidity, radiant heat of surroundings, clothing). 

Actions 

Heat stress may occur as the result of a heat wave or a constant source of heat at the workplace. There are six major factors involved: 

  • temperature

  • humidity

  • movement of air

  • radiant temperature of surroundings

  • a person’s clothing

  • physical activity
    Heat stress can cause:

• • • • • • 

increased sweating
depletion of the body’s fluid
heat intolerance
tiredness
irritability
inattention and muscular cramps 

Where heat
Control Plan Form, along with controls to be used in this situation. 

is identified as a potential hazard, this should be noted on the Site Risk Assessment and 

In order to reduce heat stress, the following controls may be applicable: 

  • provide alternate work schedules to incorporate cooler periods and provide shaded areas for outdoor work (if possible)

  • ensure ventilation is provided, including the use of an extraction fan if necessary

  • replace fluid lost through perspiration by providing drinking water, soft drinks, or fruit juices – 100‐200ml of water at frequent intervals will be adequate to reduce fluid loss in sweating

  • ensure guards are able to take a rest break away from the heat, such as in an air-conditioned office or lunch room

  • wear appropriate cool clothing, as long as this does not put the employee at risk of other injuries, and modify uniform requirements to accommodate hot conditions

  • reduce humidity and increase air movement to promote the evaporation of sweat

  • provision of hat, clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen (see Personal Protective
    Equipment Procedure 3.8)
    The Code of Practice relating to Working in Hot or Cold Environments shall be followed as appropriate.

3.14 Noise 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to identify noise exposure in the workplace and the appropriate controls necessary to minimize that exposure to noise. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all worksites where VideoEditOz has employees

References 

Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment & Risk Control Procedure 3.1 

Noise Code of Practice – WorkCover NSW 2004 

Australian Standard AS/NZS 1269 Part 3: Occupational Noise Management – Hearing Protector Program 

Definitions 

Noise ‐ Noise is a hazard that can damage hearing and cause other health effects, including high blood pressure, stress, and increased heart rate. 

Decibel ‐ Typical sound pressures vary over a very large range and are measured using a logarithmic scale. The decibel is the unit on this scale and is abbreviated to dB. 

Exposure Standard ‐ The exposure standard is the noise that exceeds an average of 85dB(A) over an eight-hour working day or a peak noise of 140dB(A). 

Actions 

Exposure to unsafe noise levels in the workplace is a hazard. Many venues at which our security guards provide services (eg entertainment venues, hotels/nightclubs) may expose them to noise. Unsafe levels of noise can lead to noise‐induced hearing loss or tinnitus (constant ringing in the ears). 

1. Noise Identification 

As a part of the Site Risk Assessment (see Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment & Risk Control Procedure 3.1), VideoEditOz shall identify if there is a risk to the guard from exposure to noise. 

The following questions are useful in determining if there is a potential noise hazard: 

  • Is there difficulty in communication between two employees at a one-meter distance (ie the speaker must raise their voice in order for the listener to understand what is said)?

  • Do employees in the area notice a reduction in hearing over the course of their shift? This reduction might not be noticed until after work.

  • Do employees experience any of the following: 

    • ringing in the ears (tinnitus);

    • the same sound having a different tone in each ear (diplacusis); or

    • blurred hearing?

  • Are any long‐term employees hard of hearing?

  • Are hearing protection devices worn by others at that workplace?

  • Are there signs indicating that hearing protective devices should be worn?
    As a part of the noise assessment process, VideoEditOz shall consult the client or venue operator to determine if the expected noise level will exceed the exposure standard where the guard will be working.

2. Minimising Exposure to Noise 

Where it has been determined that noise is a hazard to employees, then control measures shall be put in place. Example of controls that might be applicable, depending upon the situation are: 

  • Re‐location of guards to a position where noise levels are not high

  • Rotation of staff between noisy and quieter locations at the worksite

  • Provision of protective hearing devices

  • Effective use of partitions, bars and curtains in venues (these can have a big impact on reducing noise levels).
    If the work demands that a guard has to work in the vicinity of dangerous noise levels, the combination of hearing protection and administrative procedures such as rotating staff between noisy and quieter workplace locations may be necessary. Employees will be consulted in determining the most appropriate control for the task to be undertaken.
    Where noise levels exceed the exposure standard, or where it is a particular issue for security guards on site, VideoEditOz will initiate discussions with the client/owner of the premises on how to manage the issue.
    All controls that have been implemented will be monitored and reviewed regularly to ensure effective use and implementation.
    Where necessary, training and education will be provided to employees regarding noise, its effects, and the use of appropriate controls.

 

3.15 Height Work 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to prevent falls from heights. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all worksites where VideoEditOz has employees  

References 

Safe Working at Heights – Guide 2004 

Definitions 

Working at heights – any activity is undertaken where there is a possibility of falling more than 1.8m. 

Actions 

VideoEditOz will ensure that no employee is exposed to a risk of fall whilst working at heights. This includes all locations where staff/employees are required to work. 

A Site Risk Assessment shall be conducted on each worksite, prior to commencement of work. As a part of this process, areas shall be identified where there is a risk of falling from height with no suitable protection available. The client shall also be involved in this process to ensure all potential hazards are identified. 

No VideoEditOz staff/employee will be required to work in an area that does not have suitable protection from a risk of fall (from heights of 1.8m or more), and the client shall be notified of these areas. 

At the site induction for employees, security guards shall be instructed not to enter/work in areas identified as having a risk of falls. 

Regular Site Inspections (using the Site Inspection Checklist) shall be carried out to monitor these areas, protections put in place by the client, and any additional hazards. 

3.16 Accident & Incident Reporting and Investigation 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to describe the process for consultation with employees of VideoEditOz with respect to our OH&S system. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to all accidents, injuries, and/or incidents that occur on worksites in relation to the role of VideoEditOz employees. 

References 

Incident/Accident Report Form 

Definitions 

Accident ‐ a sequence of events that culminate in damage to a person or property. 

Incident ‐ a sequence of events that had the potential to culminate in damage to a person or property. The term incident refers to a “near‐miss” accident. 

Actions 

1. Accident Reporting and Investigation ‐ Internal 

All accidents, injuries, and incidents must be notified to the Principal/Supervisor immediately. An Incident/Accident Report Form shall be completed either by the employee or the Principal/Supervisor in consultation with the employee involved. 

VideoEditOz shall investigate accidents and incidents as appropriate, through the use of the Incident/Accident Report Form. This investigation shall include the classification of injuries, the recording of the incident and investigation to facilitate a satisfactory outcome. 

Records of actions taken shall be maintained and recorded on the Incident/Accident Report Form. 

Where an incident/accident has occurred at a client’s worksite, then the client shall be notified as soon as practical. 

2. Reporting to WorkCover 

The Principal shall determine the need to report events to WorkCover NSW. Instructions and forms needed to do this are to be accessed via the WorkCover NSW website (www.workcover.nsw.gov.au). 

All serious incidents must be reported to WorkCover NSW immediately. These include (but are not limited to): 

 

  • Death, amputation, life support requirements, loss of consciousness

  • Damage to plant/machinery.

  • Explosion (or risk of), fire, escape of gas, dangerous goods spill

 

WorkCover than 7 days 

• 

• • • • 

• • • 

NSW must be notified of other injuries and incidents as soon as possible, but no later following the incident. These include (but are not limited to): 

Injury or work‐related illness, that renders the employee unfit for work for a period of 7 or more days 

Damage to plant/machinery that impedes the safe operation 

Removal of workers from lead-risk work 

Exposure to blood‐borne diseases 

Use or threatened use of a weapon that involves a risk of serious injury to, or illness or, a person such as in a confrontational situation in the workplace 

A robbery that involves a risk of serious injury to, or illness of, a person.
The electric shock involves risk of serious injury
Risk of explosion, fire, dangerous goods, gas leak, or substantial property damage. 

• 

Entrapment, burns, the collapse of an excavation 

The area
36 hours
this requirement. 

For incidents involving employees: 

  • For serious incidents contact WorkCover NSW immediately on 13 10 50

  • For other incidents that may involve workers' compensation, notify VideoEditOz’s insurer
    within 48 hrs.
    Incidents involving non­employees:

  • For serious incidents contact WorkCover NSW immediately on 13 10 50

  • Complete the online notification form within 7 days www.workcover.nsw.gov.au. Incidents that involve a risk to health and safety in the workplace:

  • For serious incidents contact WorkCover NSW immediately on 13 10 50

  • Complete the online notification form within 7 days www.workcover.nsw.gov.au.
    Records shall be kept for all reported incidents for a period of 5 years.
    All activities shall be reviewed in light of the outcome of the investigative process to determine if other procedures/safe work practices need to be updated.

of the incident must be barricaded and not disturbed (once injured parties are removed) for in case of an investigation by WorkCover NSW. VideoEditOz shall liaise with the client on 

3.17 Issue Resolution 

Purpose 

The purpose of this procedure is to describe the process for the effective resolution of OH&S issues. 

Scope 

This procedure applies to OH&S issues raised by employees of VideoEditOz. 

References 

None 

Definitions 

None 

Actions 

It is the responsibility of the Principal to resolve OH&S issues as and when they arise with employees and to ensure a safe system of work. The following procedure shall be followed. 

Step 1 Problem or Issue 

Where an employee identifies an OH&S problem or issue they should raise it with the Principal, their Supervisor, or their OH&S representative/committee (where it exists), who shall make note of the issue raised. 

Step 2 Actioning the problem/issue 

The problem or issue shall be dealt with as soon as possible after being raised. Where it cannot be rectified immediately, then a solution shall be implemented as soon as practical. At a minimum, interim measures should be put in place to prevent any adverse consequences until such time the issue can be satisfactorily resolved. A safe system of work must be maintained. 

Step 3 Unsatisfactory Response 

If the issue has not been satisfactorily resolved and may be life-threatening, the employee or Principal or Supervisor may stop the work being carried out until further discussions are undertaken and the problem is resolved. 

Step 4 Dispute 

If no further action occurs, then the employee may consider the situation in dispute and make contact with a WorkCover Inspector. The Inspector may direct that the problem be addressed by issuing an Improvement Notice or Prohibition Notice. 

Step 5 Outcome 

Solutions will be monitored for effectiveness as well as being passed on to relevant employees for their information. All actions and outcomes shall be recorded by the Principal. 

 
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